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America's GPA: D+
Estimated Investment Needed by 2020:
$3.6 Trillion

Bridges  C+


Water & Environment



Public Facilities


Over two hundred million trips are taken daily across deficient bridges in the nation’s 102 largest metropolitan regions. In total, one in nine of the nation’s bridges are rated as structurally deficient, while the average age of the nation’s 607,380 bridges is currently 42 years. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) estimates that to eliminate the nation’s bridge deficient backlog by 2028, we would need to invest $20.5 billion annually, while only $12.8 billion is being spent currently. The challenge for federal, state, and local governments is to increase bridge infrastructure investments by $8 billion annually to address the identified $76 billion in needs for deficient bridges across the United States.

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Save America's Infrastructure

Dams Featured

A Plan for Aging Dams

Earlier this week, the Center for American Progress(CAP) released a report on U.S. dams, Aging Dams and Clogged Rivers: An Infrastructure Plan for U.S. Waterways.


Photo by Doug Kerr/Flickr

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Question 6  is a statewide ballot measure that asks voters to consider whether the state may issue $100 million in bonds for transportation and other


Photo: Doug Kerr/Flickr

California Decides How Voters Impact Infrastructure Projects

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NJ Road Work 2

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